Around Town in Taiohae

We thought we’d post some photos of Taiohae, where we’ve been for the last few weeks. More to come in the next post but here’s a glimpse of some of what we see around us day to day…

Baie Taiohae at dawn looking toward the village.

Baie Taiohae at dawn looking toward the village.

The small boat landing and hub of Baie Taiohae.

The small boat landing and hub of Baie Taiohae.

Taken from the waterfront. The buildings on the left of the quay include a snack shop, a small clothing and souvenir store, the offices of Nuku Hiva Yacht Services – where almost anything can be arranged for visiting yachts – a restaurant, a small boat repair shop, and the farmers’ market.

Nuku Hiva Yacht Services, or just "Kevin's."

Nuku Hiva Yacht Services, or just “Kevin’s,” who provides everything from clearance documentation to laundry services.

Ruth contemplating the dinghy landing

Ruth contemplating the dinghy landing

This isn’t the only dinghy landing; it’s just less crowded than the “dinghy rodeo” down the way, where there are a couple of ladders for climbing up the wall and where space is at a premium because most people prefer to climb up ladders rather than tires. It isn’t that difficult to climb up tires. Really. Ruth is looking at sea urchins and crabs while waiting for Randy to take this photo.

The Dinghy Rodeo. All the dinghies jostle back and forth in the surge, loosely tied near two ladders.

The Dinghy Rodeo. All the dinghies jostle back and forth in the surge, loosely tied near two ladders. Coming in you just push aside dinghies to get to the ladder.

Boat needs work everywhere. The deep V hull shape is good for waves and ocean swells. No flat-bottom boats here.

Boats needs work everywhere. The deep V hull shape is good for waves and ocean swells. No flat-bottom boats here.

Morning fish market

Morning fish market on the quay.

P1030808_edited-1Cafe Tematapuaua is one of the cruiser hangouts. It’s covered and open-sided, so is often cooler than outside. There’s this thing called “coconut time;” it’s the time from when the sun first hits the coconuts on the trees until it leaves them in shade again. Locals go home and we try to be under cover during “coconut time” as it is the hottest time of the day. This is when we update software, download weather data, update journals and blogs, and catch up with emails and news. Oh, and socialize. And enjoy a cold beer. And talk about weather, the cruiser’s favorite topic.

Cafe Tematapuaua, one of the cruiser hangouts. It's covered and open-sided, so is often cooler than outside. There's this thing called "coconut time;" it's the time from when the sun first hits the coconuts on the trees until it leaves them in shade again. We try to be under cover during "coconut time" as it is the hottest time of the day. This is when we update software, download weather data, update journals and blogs, and catch up with emails and news.

Cafe Tematapuaua

 

Ruth hanging out in Cafe Tematapuaua

Ruth hanging out. We get to listen to local radio all day. In the mornings the announcer reads the lunch menu for every restaurant and cafe on the island.  The rest of the day is devoted to popular music. Mostly Marquesan techno-pop rave dance music.

Our host, Celina, runs Cafe Tematapuaua.

Our host, Celina, runs Cafe Tematapuaua. She serves a great lunch.

Tiki of a other and two children, one clearly a boy, in the central courtyard of the community arts, crafts, and cafe center.

Tiki of a woman (mother?) and two children in the garden central to the community arts & crafts center, the farmers’ market and Cafe Tematapuaua.

One of the noticeable things about every village we’ve been to here in the Marquesas is the absence of trash. Of course, you will see some, but it’s remarkable how little of it there is. People dispose of garbage by either burning it or burying it. We might feel these aren’t the most environmentally sound ways of disposing of garbage, but choices are limited on the islands.

Buying fresh fruits and vegetables at the market next to Celine's place. There are always basic fruits and vegetables here, but Saturdays and Wednesdays are the days when the greatest variety of produce shows up. I've even seen tomatoes once.

Buying fresh fruits and vegetables at the market next to Celina’s place. There are always basic fruits and vegetables here, but Saturdays and Wednesdays are the days when the greatest variety of produce shows up.  We’ve even seen tomatoes once.

Hanging out at the morning market

The lady vendors hanging out at the morning market. They’re all ladies. You can also buy jams, syrups, preserved peppers, and other home-made goodies. On Saturdays and Wednesday you’ll find home baked goods like those shown here.

There are five local “magasin” or grocery stores in Taiohae, all fairly small. You can buy canned and dried foods including milk; a selection of frozen meat cuts; household cleaning products; personal products like soap and shampoo; and, of course, limited beer and alcohol. There’s usually a small “hardware” corner, too. And all of them sell baguettes, potatoes (russets) and onions. These last vegetables are not found in the farmer’s market; only in the magasin.

Ruth and cruising friend Greg with two breadfruit for our galley. Yum!

Ruth and cruising friend Greg with two breadfruit for our galley. Yum!

We’ve discovered several new-to-us fruits and vegetables. One we like best so far is breadfruit (found only in the farmer’s market or by asking someone with a tree in their yard). The ripe pulp mashed with diced onion, salt & pepper, an egg or two and a bit of flour can be fried into delicious patties. Great for breakfast, lunch or with dinner. A Marquesan favorite is to slice the fruit into “french fries” and deep fry.

Raw water strainer basket corrosion. The strainer keeps small crabs, jellyfish, and debris from clogging the engine cooling system. This is now a high priority to replace!

Raw water strainer basket corrosion. The strainer keeps small crabs, jellyfish, and debris from clogging the engine cooling system. This is now a high priority to replace!

And there’s always boat work to do. A couple of days ago Randy decided it was time to check the raw water strainer in the bilge. It’s been in place for more than 5 years without sign of corrosion or age. But the boat is now in warm, salty water all the time. Clearly, a new bilge strainer is needed. This one was put back, temporarily; a new plastic one will arrive in Papeete next month, with relatives (Thank you!). The replacement will, we hope, will hold up in this corrosive environment.

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One thought on “Around Town in Taiohae

  1. Check out the Breadfruit Institute on Kauai, HI. webpage. They have lots of information and recipes for breadfruit. When I was in the Cook Islands we had what I thought was potato salad, but it was breadfruit. One of my friends here uses it in stews.
    Love all the pictures. Catholic church is certainly worth visiting. Beautiful wood carvings.
    Mom

    Like

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